NEBRASKA CULTURAL ENDOWMENT WELCOMES NEW BOARD MEMBER

Katie Weitz, PhD

The Nebraska Cultural Endowment welcomes Katie Weitz, PhD, to its Board of Directors. Katie is currently the executive director of the Weitz Family Foundation in Omaha. She brings to the board extensive non-profit leadership and fundraising experience, as well as a strong background in the arts and education. Continue Reading…

Nebraska Cultural Endowment Call To Action

A year end message from Marian Fey, Executive Director of the Nebraska Cultural Endowment

Through the generosity of donors like you and our unique partnership with the state, the Nebraska Cultural Endowment is poised reach $10,000,000 at both the public and private funds by the end of the year. The earnings from this permanently endowed $20,000,000 are critical in supporting the grants and programs of Humanities Nebraska and the Nebraska Arts Council. The two councils have already sustained a 4% cut in state funds, and will face another 8% cut in next year’s state appropriations. Continue Reading…

Art Is My Livelihood

oh lord, not another piece of word art: if you’re buying this you have either taste or money

Material: Embroidered Cotton  15 x 12″, 2015. 

Jennifer’s Story:

In a warm, darkened room, during a slide presentation for a basic freshman drawing course, Professor Richard Wiegmann projected a line drawing by Matisse, and paused…. And I thought to myself, well, so what? Continue Reading…

Omaha World Herald, 08/15/2016, Robert L. Nefsky: Crosby’s legacy: cultural endowment

Photo Credit to Jeffery Z. Carney / The Omaha World Herald

The writer, of Lincoln, is a founding director and a past president of the Nebraska Cultural Endowment.

Recent days marked the passing of LaVon Crosby, a retired Nebraska state senator from Lincoln and widow of former Gov. Robert Crosby.

LaVon Crosby exhibited the personal qualities we should expect of our elected officials. She worked passionately and successfully on issues that were important to her and her constituents. She comported herself with dignity. She could disagree with her colleagues while remaining respectful and without demonizing them or their positions.

Continue Reading…